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SMD resistor code calculator

This simple calculator will help you determine the value of any SMD resistor. To get started, input the 3 or 4 digit code and hit the "Calculate" button or Enter.

Note: The program was tested rigorously, but it still may have a few bugs. So, when in doubt (and when it's possible) don't hesitate to use a multimeter to double-check the critical components.

See also the color code calculator on this page for MELF and standard through-hole resistors.

How to calculate the value of an SMD resistor

Most chip resistors are marked with a 3-digit or 4-digit code -- the numerical equivalent of the familiar color code for through-hole components. Recently, a new coding system (the EIA-96) has appeared on precision SMDs.

The 3-digit code

Standard-tolerance SMD resistors are marked with a simple 3-digit code. The first two numbers will indicate the significant digits, and the third will be the multiplier, telling you the power of ten to which the two significant digits must be multiplied (or how many zeros to add). Resistances of less than 10 ohms do not have a multiplier, the letter 'R' is used instead to indicate the position of the decimal point.

3-digit code examples:

220 = 22 100 (1) = 22Ω (not 220Ω!)
471 = 47 101 (10) = 470Ω
102 = 10 102 (100) = 1000Ω or 1kΩ
3R3 = 3.3Ω

more 3-digit SMD resistor examples...

The 4-digit code

The 4-digit code is used for marking precision surface mount resistors. It's similar to the previous system, the only difference is the number of significant digits: the first three numbers will tell us the significant digits, and the fourth will be the multiplier, indicating the power of ten to which the three significant digits must be multiplied (or how many zeros to add). Resistances of less than 100 ohms are marked with the help of the letter 'R', indicating the position of the decimal point.

4-digit code examples:

4700 = 470 100 (1) = 470Ω (not 4700Ω!)
2001 = 200 101 (10) = 2000Ω or 2kΩ
1002 = 100 102 (100) = 10000Ω or 10kΩ
15R0 = 15.0Ω

more 4-digit SMD resistor examples...

EIA-96

Recently, a new coding system (EIA-96) has appeared on 1% SMD resistors. It consists of a three character code: the first 2 numbers will tell us the 3 significant digits of the resistor value (see the lookup table below) and the third marking (a letter) will indicate the multiplier.

CodeMultiplier
Z0.001
Y or R0.01
X or S0.1
A1
B or H10
C100
D1000
E10000
F100000

EIA-96 code examples:

01Y = 100 0.01 = 1Ω
68X = 499 0.1 = 49.9Ω
76X = 604 0.1 = 60.4Ω
01A = 100 1 = 100Ω
29B = 196 10 = 1.96kΩ
01C = 100 100 = 10kΩ

more EIA-96 SMD examples...

CodeValueCodeValueCodeValueCodeValue
01100251784931673562
02102261825032474576
03105271875133275590
04107281915234076604
05110291965334877619
06113302005435778634
07115312055536579649
08118322105637480665
09121332155738381681
10124342215839282698
11127352265940283715
12130362326041284732
13133372376142285750
14137382436243286768
15140392496344287787
16143402556445388806
17147412616546489825
18150422676647590845
19154432746748791866
20158442806849992887
21162452876951193909
22165462947052394931
23169473017153695953
24174483097254996976

Notes:

  • an SMD resistor with a marking of 0, 00, 000 or 0000 is a jumper (a zero-ohm link).
  • a chip resistor marked with the standard 3 digit code and a short bar below the marking denotes a precision (1% or less) resistor with a value taken from the E24 series (these values are usually reserved for 5% resistors). For example: 122 = 1.2kΩ 1%. Some manufacturers underline all three digits -- do not confuse this with the code used on low value current sensing resistors.
  • SMDs with values in order of milliohms, made for current sensing applications are often marked with the help of the letter M or m, showing the decimal point location (with the value in milliohms). For example: 1M50 = 1.50mΩ, 2M2 = 2.2mΩ.
  • Current sensing SMDs can also be marked with a long bar on top (1m5 = 1.5mΩ, R001 = 1mΩ, etc.) or a long bar under the code (101 = 0.101Ω, 047 = 0.047Ω). The underline is used when the starting 'R' has to be omitted due to the limited space on the resistor's body. So, for example, R068 becomes 068 = 0.068Ω (68mΩ).

Power rating

To find out the approximative power rating of your SMD resistor, measure its length and width. A few commonly used package dimensions with the corresponding typical power ratings are presented in the table below. Use this table as a guide only, and always consult the component's datasheet for the exact value.

SMD resistor dimensions
PackageSize in inches (LW)Size in mm (LW)Power rating
02010.024" 0.012"0.6 mm 0.3 mm1/20W
04020.04" 0.02"1.0 mm 0.5 mm1/16W
06030.063" 0.031"1.6 mm 0.8 mm1/16W
08050.08" 0.05"2.0 mm 1.25 mm1/10W
12060.126" 0.063"3.2 mm 1.6 mm1/8W
12100.126" 0.10"3.2 mm 2.5 mm1/4W
18120.18" 0.12"4.5 mm x 3.2 mm1/3W
20100.20" 0.10"5.0 mm 2.5 mm1/2W
25120.25" 0.12"6.35 mm 3.2 mm1W

Tolerance

The standard 3 and 4 digit code does not give us a way to determine the SMD resistor's tolerance.

In most cases, however, you'll find that a surface mount resistor marked with the 3-digit code has a tolerance of 5% and a resistor marked with 4-digit code or the new EIA-96 code has a tolerance of 1% or less.

There are many exceptions to this rule, so always check the manufacturer's datasheet, especially if the component's tolerance is critical for your application.